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Weeping Silver Leaved Pear Pyrus Salicifolia Pendula

Description & features

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Product description

PYRUS SALICIFOLIA PENDULA - Weeping Silver Leaved Pear

Characteristics

Pyrus salicifolia pendula is a weeping form of the Willow-leaved Pear. It is a very elegant, small tree with long, overhanging branches, suitable for even the smallest garden. It grows to only about 7 m (20ft) tall and 7m (20ft) wide.  It is easily trimmed and can make an umbrella or ball shape.

It has long willow-like leaves, grey-white and velvety. The cream-white flowers appear in April, simultaneously with the leaves.

Where to grow

Easy to grow in most garden situations.

Did you know?

The parent tree Pyrus salicifolia comes originally from Russia and Armenia.  It was discovered and introduced by the German botanist and explorer P.S. Pallas in 1780.


 

 

Features

Mature height
Small - 5-10 metres
Spread
5-10 metres
Shape / habit
Round Headed
Weeping
Growth rate
Slow
Soil type
All soil types
Sun levels
Full sun
Difficulty / hard to grow
Medium
Evergreen / Deciduous
Deciduous
Leaf
Silver/Blue
Foliage
Dense
Small leaves
Flower colour
White
Flowering type
Single
Flowering month
March
Uses
Parkland Tree
Garden Tree
Small garden Tree
City/Urban Sites

Features

Mature height
Small - 5-10 metres
Spread
5-10 metres
Shape / habit
Round Headed
Weeping
Growth rate
Slow
Soil type
All soil types
Sun levels
Full sun
Difficulty / hard to grow
Medium
Evergreen / Deciduous
Deciduous
Leaf
Silver/Blue
Foliage
Dense
Small leaves
Flower colour
White
Flowering type
Single
Flowering month
March
Uses
Parkland Tree
Garden Tree
Small garden Tree
City/Urban Sites

Aftercare

For the continued healthy growth of your trees, shrubs or hedging it is vital that you follow the advice below.

Watering

The main reason that plants die within 12 months of having been planted is lack of water.  It is essential throughout the spring and summer, to give a heavy enough watering to enable the water to penetrate right down to the deepest root level of the tree.  In hot dry spells give the equivalent of 2 bucketfuls every three days.

Weed Control

One of the most common causes of lack of water is competition from grass.  When trees are first establishing, the grass roots would be at the same level as the tree roots and are far more efficient at taking up water and thus choke the tree.  It is vital for 3 years after planting that your tree or hedge has a circle or strip one  metre wide completely free of grass.  The way to eliminate grass in order of effectiveness is:

  1. Spray off the grass with a glyphosate based weed killer such as Roundup.  Apply each year for the first 3 years.  It is best applied when the tree is dormant as it is absorbed through green leaves and kills the plant off at the roots.
  2. Firmly fit a mulch mat around the base of the tree by tucking the edges into the soil and put a thick layer of bark mulch on top of this.  This can be done after the initial spraying with glyphosate and should avoid the need for further spraying.

Mowing or strimming is NOT an answer to the problem.  Each time you mow, the grass will grow back more vigorously and strimming invariably leads to lacerated trunks.

Staking

If trees are not correctly secured they will rock in the planting pit. Roots not firmly in contact with the soil are unable to take up moisture and nutrients, resulting in die back or death of the tree.  Check, particularly after windy weather, that stakes are still solidly in the ground keeping the base of the trunk firm.  The purpose of the stakes is to anchor the roots.   Flexing in the wind, higher up the trunk, is not necessarily a problem if the roots are firm.

Bellow is list of the correct system to use to secure your trees.

  • 40/60, 60/80, 80/100 whips - Unless rabbit/deer problem no need to stake.
  • 100/125, 125/150  1.2m Cane and Easi tie.
  • 150/175  1.2m square stake and a buckle tie and spacer.
  • 175/250, 6/8, 8/10 15L 1.65 Tree stake and a buckle tie and spacer.
  • All larger trees. 2 x 1.65 Tree stake and cross rail with 38mm cushion spacer and 1m of 38mm strapping.

Ties

Always use our recommended tree ties or strapping.  These are designed and manufactured with the correct amount of give to hold the tree firm without strangling it. They should be checked at the end of each growing season for adjustment as the trunk thickens.  Non proprietary materials such as baler twine will cut into the bark and should not be used.

Protection from Animal Damage

Rabbits, deer, sheep, cattle and horses can all potentially damage trees.  Ask us for advice on the most appropriate guards for your trees or hedge.  Squirrels are also a terrible pest when trees get to about 20ft tall but there is no protection available.


Comments

By Helen Scurr on 01/05/2014

Would this tree be suitable to plant in a large container?

By Simon on 12/05/2014

Hello,

It would be OK in a large pot for a certain amount of time. But you would need to keep it well watered and fed. If you pruned it could last a long time this way. But would need daily watering when it is in leaf.

I hope this helps,

Simon

By Megan Casserly on 21/05/2014

I had a weeping willow leafed pear many years ago in the Clyde Valley. Would it thrive in a very small Edwardian front garden, if it was pruned as suggested above?

By Simon on 24/05/2014

Hello Megan,

Yes it is possible to keep them pruned to go into a small garden. There is one near my house that is kept to about 10ft tall.

Kind regards,

Simon

By Zella on 28/06/2014

Seven years ago my weeping silver pear was pruned back to a manmanageable height and shape (previously it was a large umbrella). It took a while to recover and was doing well and a lovely drooping branches unfortunately this year early spring we had nice leaves and buds then it went down hill and now there are a few green leave at the top and bottom the rest have dried up and fallen off.  Its look awful any suggestions. We live in the south of england and the winter was very mild with only a few frosts. It present it does not look as if it growing usually by now it would need a trim to keep its shape.

By Simon on 14/07/2014

Hello Zella,

I think you might be correct when you talk about the lack of frosts. This has caused an increase in fungal diseases and it sounds like it may have caught one. I would leave it be and hope for a nice cold winter to snap everything back to normal.

Kind regards,

Simon

By Glenda on 09/08/2014

When is the best time to prune a weeping pear tree

By Simon on 11/08/2014

Hello Glenda,

The weeping pear is best pruned in winter.

By Jill on 17/08/2014

We have a weeping pear which has become much to big,can we prune into the main branches it would be the only way to reduce its high and with

Jill 17 august.

By Simon on 04/09/2014

Hello Jill,

It is possible to prune it, though the harder you prune it the longer it will take to look good again. You would want to do it in the winter so it can shoot away again next spring.

By Anne on 28/09/2014

I’m looking for some trees to create screening from our neighbours that won’t get too big, and think the weeping pear might work if I keep them pruned. It looks like the tree is fairly dense so wondering if in Winter it might still provide some screening? (A search online comes up with an evergreen ornamental pear, but only seems to be available in Melbourne Australia!).
Also can you advise on container vs bare root for this tree. Building work currently going on and would hope to plant Feb/March.  Thanks

By Simon on 06/10/2014

Hello Anne,

It might work but as it is slow growing it would take some time to get big enough to do the job. The one in the picture is 30+ years old. You might be better going for something evergreen such as a holly? I have never heard of an evergreen pear but will have a look.

It tends to be cheaper to plant bare rooted, but you can only plant from November to March and not all plants are available bare rooted.

I hope this helps.

By Katy on 28/10/2014

Hi, I planted a weeping pear tree approx. 5-6 years ago, we have decided to extend our house and the tree needs to be moved to do this.  What is the best way to move this well developed tree.  Do you think I am likely to lose it due the fact it is quite established?
Any advise is well received…

By Simon on 30/10/2014

Hello Katy,

It would be possible to move a tree of this age but it isn’t easy and there are no guarantees. You would want to do it in early December and dig it up with as big a rootball as possible. Try and get it in the ground as soon as you can and it would need staking well to support it in its new home. Then it is fingers crossed that it takes.

I hope that helps.

By Peter on 17/03/2015

Can you eat the fruit?
How?

By Simon on 23/03/2015

Hello Peter,

I have never heard of anyone eating the fruit I am afraid. So can’t offer much help on this one sorry.

By liz thwaites on 16/04/2015

We have had a weeping pear in a previous garden which was very successful

By Maria Kerr on 19/05/2015

I have had my weeping pear for about four years so it is still quite small and I would like to keep it that way.  Can I pollard it every year?

By Simon on 05/06/2015

Hello Maria,

I wouldn’t pollard it, but you can prune them every year to keep them in shape. I hope this helps.

By Gareth Morris on 15/07/2015

When is the best time of year to plant a silver leaf pear tree please?

By Liz parker on 28/07/2015

We planted two weeping pears at the front of our house they have been established for about 11 years we prune as recommended and they are much admired however two years ago one of them started to loose it’s leaves dramatically ! The whole of the tree is now dead - we keep breaking off bits to check and they are brown, no sign of green life ! However it did start to shoot from the base ( the graft site ) the other one is perfectly healthy at this time our neighbours were have a drive concreted and had a cement mixer on site creating lots of lime dust, could this be the cause ? It was not starved of water, in fact a thing but and we have treated them both alike. I did take a branch to the Edinburgh Botanics for analysis Nd they said there was no sign of pest attack and couldn’t give me a conclusive answer. What I would like to ask is, if we cut it back to the graft site could it re grow or if we uproot it cN we plant something else on its site or will we have to replace the soil around it ?

By Simon on 04/08/2015

You can plant container trees at any time of year and bare root in the dormant season (Nov-Mar). The only thing to bear in mind is that newly planted trees will need heavy watering every few days in the growing season.

By Simon on 10/08/2015

Dear Liz,

Sorry to hear about your weeping pear. You could try to regrow the tree from the living stems on the trunk, training them to the shape you require. If you are looking to plant something else there, then yes, you could put a non-Rosaceae family tree in the same site without replacing the soil. If you want to replant with another Pyrus or any other plant from the Rosaceae family then you are right, you would need to replace the soil to avoid replant disease.

By Dawn on 19/08/2015

Hi
I have planted this lovely tree only 2 weeks ago now and it’s not looking very healthy at all.The leaves have turned a very dark colour and have gone very crispy!
I did a scratch test and the branches are still green underneath.Just wanted to know if this has happened to anyone else’s and whether it’s going to be ok or not?

By Simon on 21/08/2015

Dear Dawn,

Pyrus salicifolia is quite susceptible to drought stress, so it could be that the tree has suffered from perhaps a short period of drying out since planting. It should make a full recovery if watered heavily every few days, if this is the case.

By Nick Holdsworth on 21/10/2015

Hello, I have had this lovely tree for the last 15 years and prune it back in November when most of the fruit has fallen. I have always collected the fruit and disposed of it in the belief that any rotten fruit that remained on the ground would harm the roses beneath. Can you advise if the fruit could remain on the ground as compost without causing any harm?

By Simon on 24/10/2015

Hello Nick,

I have never heard of the fruits from this tree harming roses. Do you mean that the fruit would harbour insect pests or affect the soil in a detrimental way? Afraid I can’t advise as it’s not something I’ve heard of.

By Marion Bollans on 25/06/2016

I have had my willow pear for about 8 years but this year it did not flower.  Full of leaf and very healthy - any clues please?

By Simon on 27/06/2016

Hello Marion,

I wonder whether you have pruned the tree and taken off the buds?

By rowland on 19/07/2016

will the weaping pear tree grow in a seaside garden

By Simon on 20/07/2016

Hello Rowland,

The weeping pear would be perfect for a seaside garden as it is very tough, with silvery leaves adapted to dry and exposed conditions.

By Marc on 22/09/2017

Hi,
How long does it take the 15L tree to grow to the 30L size?  When does it start to look like a tree?!!

By Simon on 29/09/2017

Hello Marc,

The growth rate very much depends on conditions, so it’s not possible to say with certainty, but the 15L should get to about the same size as a 30L in around 3-5 years. It’s quite slow growing, and in the first few years most of the energy will be devoted to establishing the roots in the soil, so you may not notice much. The bushy head will develop in time, but again very much depends on the situation!

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