Ornamental Pear Pyrus Calleryana Chanticleer

Description & features

British Grown - The British Grown logo denotes plants and trees that have been both propagated and grown in the UK. Read more

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Size and quantity

Photo
Size / Height
Price
Quantity
 
15L pot size / 1.75-2.75m
£54.00
30L pot size / 2.4-3.5m
£144.00
70L pot size / 3.5-4.5m
£257.50

All prices include VAT

All prices include VAT

All prices include VAT

All prices include VAT

This product will also be available from November to March as a bare-root plant.

Sizes and prices will appear on the website later in the year. What does bare-root mean?

British Grown - The British Grown logo denotes plants and trees that have been both propagated and grown in the UK. Read more

Product description

PYRUS CALLERYANA CHANTICLEER – Ornamental Pear

Characteristics

This ornamental pear has become in the UK, Europe and America one of the most planted street trees. It has been called ‘The perfect street tree’ it will grow to about 12m (40ft) fairly quickly with an upright tightly branched habit.
It is a strong and healthy, medium-sized and slender tree with a beautifully formed, regular crown.  In spring it bears clouds of beautiful white flowers in summer it has healthy, shiny leaves and in autumn it turns magnificent red and purple. In mild winters the leaves can stay on the tree until nearly Christmas.

Where to grow

It is good windproof, fairly resistant to salt winds, tolerates air pollution and it resistant to diseases and fire blight.

Did you know?

Chanticleer is named after the cockerel captured by the fox in the Nuns Priests Tale by Chaucer  and was selected in 1956 by Edward H. Scanlon in in Cleveland, Ohio.  It is a cultivar of the Callery Pear, Pyrus calleryana and native to China.


 

Features

Mature height
Medium - 10-15 metres
Spread
0-5 metres
Shape / habit
Pyramidal
Growth rate
Medium
Soil type
All soil types
Sun levels
Full sun
Partial shade
Difficulty / hard to grow
Easy
Evergreen / Deciduous
Deciduous
Season of interest
Autumn
Spring
Summer
Autumn colour
Orange
Red
Leaf
Green
Foliage
Dense
Early to Leaf
Late to drop leaves
Flower colour
White
Flowering type
Single
Flowering month
March
April
Scent
Scented Flowers
Uses
Screening
Parkland Tree
Garden Tree
City/Urban Sites
Used for Pleaching
Flower Arranging

Features

Mature height
Medium - 10-15 metres
Spread
0-5 metres
Shape / habit
Pyramidal
Growth rate
Medium
Soil type
All soil types
Sun levels
Full sun
Partial shade
Difficulty / hard to grow
Easy
Evergreen / Deciduous
Deciduous
Season of interest
Autumn
Spring
Summer
Autumn colour
Orange
Red
Leaf
Green
Foliage
Dense
Early to Leaf
Late to drop leaves
Flower colour
White
Flowering type
Single
Flowering month
March
April
Scent
Scented Flowers
Uses
Screening
Parkland Tree
Garden Tree
City/Urban Sites
Used for Pleaching
Flower Arranging

Aftercare

For the continued healthy growth of your trees, shrubs or hedging it is vital that you follow the advice below.

Watering

The main reason that plants die within 12 months of having been planted is lack of water.  It is essential throughout the spring and summer, to give a heavy enough watering to enable the water to penetrate right down to the deepest root level of the tree.  In hot dry spells give the equivalent of 2 bucketfuls every three days.

Weed Control

One of the most common causes of lack of water is competition from grass.  When trees are first establishing, the grass roots would be at the same level as the tree roots and are far more efficient at taking up water and thus choke the tree.  It is vital for 3 years after planting that your tree or hedge has a circle or strip one  metre wide completely free of grass.  The way to eliminate grass in order of effectiveness is:

  1. Spray off the grass with a glyphosate based weed killer such as Roundup.  Apply each year for the first 3 years.  It is best applied when the tree is dormant as it is absorbed through green leaves and kills the plant off at the roots.
  2. Firmly fit a mulch mat around the base of the tree by tucking the edges into the soil and put a thick layer of bark mulch on top of this.  This can be done after the initial spraying with glyphosate and should avoid the need for further spraying.

Mowing or strimming is NOT an answer to the problem.  Each time you mow, the grass will grow back more vigorously and strimming invariably leads to lacerated trunks.

Staking

If trees are not correctly secured they will rock in the planting pit. Roots not firmly in contact with the soil are unable to take up moisture and nutrients, resulting in die back or death of the tree.  Check, particularly after windy weather, that stakes are still solidly in the ground keeping the base of the trunk firm.  The purpose of the stakes is to anchor the roots.   Flexing in the wind, higher up the trunk, is not necessarily a problem if the roots are firm.

Bellow is list of the correct system to use to secure your trees.

  • 40/60, 60/80, 80/100 whips - Unless rabbit/deer problem no need to stake.
  • 100/125, 125/150  1.2m Cane and Easi tie.
  • 150/175  1.2m square stake and a buckle tie and spacer.
  • 175/250, 6/8, 8/10 15L 1.65 Tree stake and a buckle tie and spacer.
  • All larger trees. 2 x 1.65 Tree stake and cross rail with 38mm cushion spacer and 1m of 38mm strapping.

Ties

Always use our recommended tree ties or strapping.  These are designed and manufactured with the correct amount of give to hold the tree firm without strangling it. They should be checked at the end of each growing season for adjustment as the trunk thickens.  Non proprietary materials such as baler twine will cut into the bark and should not be used.

Protection from Animal Damage

Rabbits, deer, sheep, cattle and horses can all potentially damage trees.  Ask us for advice on the most appropriate guards for your trees or hedge.  Squirrels are also a terrible pest when trees get to about 20ft tall but there is no protection available.


Comments

By Phil stone on 20/09/2015

What do the form figures mean next to flowering pear ?
1-3. 3-9 and 10 + ?
Ta

By Simon on 24/09/2015

Dear Phil,

This refers to the pricing brackets for bulk orders of bare root trees (1-2 trees, 3-9 trees or more than 10 trees).

By Janette Davies on 02/03/2016

What planting distance would you advise between the pyrus calleryana, please.I am thinking of using them ,or maybe amalanchia ,to line a driveway.I imagine the pyrus would give more privacy,being a denser tree? Many thanks in anticipation of your reply.

By Simon on 05/03/2016

Dear Janette,

I would leave at least 2m between the Pyrus Chanticleer trees. You are right, the crown on the Pyrus is denser than that of the Amelanchier.

By Debbie on 25/04/2016

Hi, would the ornamental pear survive in soggy/wet soil?  I have a circular driveway with a central piece of grass that did have roses but they couldn’t take the soggy conditions in the winter. I’m looking for something that has prescence as its in front of the house but will not end up dwarfing the view of the house?  This
Looks perfect if it tolerates the soil.

Debbie

By Simon on 20/05/2016

Hello Debbie,

Pyrus calleryana Chanticleer will tolerate fairly damp conditions, but not permanent waterlogging. Bear in mind it is in the Rosaceae family, though, so you should replace the soil if there were previously roses in there that met their end, to avoid replant disease.

By Jeff on 06/06/2016

Hi
What does Light Standard and Standard refer to please?
Ive spent hours researching and think the Pyrus calleryana Chanticleer is the tree for me.

By Simon on 08/06/2016

Hello Jeff,

Light Standard and Standard are tree sizes, equivalent to 6-8cm girth and 8-10cm girth at 1m from the base. We grade trees by this measurement in the bare root season (Nov-Mar).

By Stephen gallwey on 13/07/2016

Hi
How long would the flowering period of the Chanticleer pear be in the spring ?
Would it be more or less than a cherry ?
Stephen

By Simon on 15/07/2016

Hello Stephen,

The length of flowering really depends on the weather. A period of fine, warm spring days will lengthen the flowering period, which can be 2-4 weeks, approximately. The same goes for cherries. A sheltered site will give a longer flowering period than an exposed, windy situation.

By Cheryll on 06/08/2016

When would the best time be to plant this type of tree, or will it cope with September plantingA

By Simon on 11/08/2016

Dear Cheryll,

You can plant container grown trees at any time of year. September would be a good time as it allows the tree to establish a little before the cold weather sets in. Bare root Pyrus can be planted from approx. December to March. You can choose your own tree at the nursery if you opt for container-grown, while we would choose a tree for you if you take a bare root one.

By Lesley on 06/09/2016

Have been informed that the blossom on these trees isn’t a very nice smell

By Simon on 14/09/2016

Hello Lesley,

Some people don’t enjoy the scent of the flowers, but we think it’s akin to the scent of hawthorn.

By Pippa on 14/10/2016

How invasive are the roots, I would like to grow it about a meter away from a garden wall,  for privacy reasons, but my neighbour is worried the roots will damage the wall

By Simon on 14/10/2016

Hello Pippa,

As a rule of thumb, tree roots tend to spread as far wide as a tree is tall. There are too many factors involved to predict whether a tree will have a detrimental effect on a given structure, but problems usually occur when water-demanding trees like willows, poplars and oaks are planted on shrinkable clay soils. Construction type and foundations are also involved.

By Ann Lambden on 20/10/2016

Would this ornamental Chanticleer pear cross pollinate a Comice pear tree please?

By Simon on 21/10/2016

Hello Ann,

I’m afraid Pyrus Chanticleer won’t pollinate Comice pear. Another eating variety such as Conference or Williams would work.

By Ian on 31/10/2016

Hi, do these trees qualify for the £8.33/flat rate delivery charge?  They’re perfect for what I need but I live in Durham so if they don’t qualify for this delivery charge they’d end up costing far more than I was wanting to pay.  Thanks.

By Simon on 04/11/2016

Hello Ian,

No, I’m afraid only whips can be sent out by courier at £8.33. All trees need to be sent in our own vehicles to ensure they arrive in good condition, attracting our standard delivery rate based on distance from the nursery. You are, of course, welcome to collect directly from us!

By Rodney Dyer on 02/01/2017

I am thinking of planting Chanticleer pears as a replacement for leylandii as a screen at the end of my garden. What spacing would you recommend? Could/should they be any closer than the 2m you have recommended for lining a driveway? Would it be essential to remove the leylandii roots, or could they just be cut off at ground level before planting the Chanticleers? Do you supply them any smaller than Light Standard, e.g. as whips? Thanks

By Simon on 04/01/2017

Hello Rodney,

A spacing of 2.5m would be ideal. I wouldn’t put them any closer than 2m. The treatment you need to give to the leylandii depends on their size. It’s best if you can have the stumps ground out, but you don’t need to remove all the roots as long as there is plenty of space to plant the new trees and for their roots to grow into. We don’t supply Chanticleer as whips - the smallest size available if the light standard (6-8cm girth).

By Ahmed Shalaby on 23/01/2017

Dear Sir,
I want to know about the temperature and humidity rang it can tolerate with?

Kind Regards

By Simon on 25/01/2017

Hello Ahmed,

Pyrus Chanticleer is hardy down to -10 degrees and grows well in temperate climates. It is grown a lot in the United States and is said to cope with the climate in the southern states, so has quite a wide range of tolerance with regards to humidity.

By Rebecca Kavanagh on 03/02/2017

Hi, when do you start to remove lower branches, we are planting next to a fence and eventually I would like the leaves to start at the height of the fence.
Thanks

By Simon on 08/02/2017

Dear Rebecca,

Prune off unwanted branches in winter. Take them off while they are small and they will leave minimal scarring on the trunk. Be careful not to take off too much at once, though - aim to leave at least a third of the trunk with a decent amount of branching/foliage. If the tree isn’t much taller than the fence yet then I would wait for it to grow a bit more before taking off lower branches.

By Melanie on 01/03/2017

I was recommended this tree for a small front garden and told that it grows to 4m. Please can you clarify if it is 4 or 12. Thank you

By Simon on 03/03/2017

Hello Melanie,

This tree will get to 12 metres tall, full height, so it’s not suited to a small front garden. I wonder if you were thinking of Pyrus salicifolia Pendula? That only gets to about 7m and is quite slow growing. If you are looking for trees up to 4m we would call this very small. You could look at things like weeping Cotoneaster or Sun Rival crab apple if you want something very small.

By Helen Langston on 04/03/2017

PYRUS CALLERYANA CHANTICLEER
Ornamental Pear for a 15L size 6-9 ft approx £45   how long would it take to reach approx 7 meters please?  purchasing as boundary between 2 houses to block bedroom windows.  thanks.

By Simon on 08/03/2017

Hello Helen,

The growth rate will very much depend on conditions and in the early days the tree will be putting most of its energy into establishing its root system, so there isn’t so much growth on top. It would probably be about 10 years before it was 7m tall, but this is just a rough guide.

By Cindy on 01/05/2017

We were planning to plant silver birches in small clumps of 3/4 at the end of our garden to provide an interesting ‘woodland’ area and screening of bungalow beyond. Our neighbour in the bungalow is highly allergic to Birch and Pyrus Chanticleer has been suggested as an alternative. Would they take to planting in tighter clumps do you think, or would the 2m minimum you suggest still apply?
Many thanks
Cindy

By Simon on 05/05/2017

Hello Cindy,

It is possible to plant trees very close together, if you don’t mind the crowns merging. When planted close together, the trees will be competing for light and resources in the soil. This can affect the way they grow, for example making them thinner as they reach up for the light, or more slow to grow because of the competition. It is possible to prune and train Pyrus Chanticleer, so you could keep them quite narrow, but this would look more formal than woodland.

By Chris on 06/03/2018

Hi, noting the comment above about replacing soil that previously had rose bushes in it that had come to an end, is it okay to plant this tree right next to a rose bush which is still flourishing or should I remove the rose? I will likely have to cut into the roots of the rose when digging the hole for the tree. Thank you

By Simon on 06/03/2018

Hello Chris,

Replant disease will occur if you put it in the same position, but isn’t generally a problem if you’re planting nearby. On a separate note you’ll likely find the rose will struggle having a tree right next to it in the future, as most grow best in full sun. If at all possible a position further away would be more suited if you are keen to keep the rose.

By george buss on 10/03/2019

Are these trees grafted on to a different rootstock ?  I have seen them growing on the streets with some very thorny sucker growth around the base of some trunks.

By Simon on 13/03/2019

Hello George,

Yes all Pyrus Chanticleer would be grafted, normally onto Wild Pear/Pyrus Communis. Pyrus Communis does have thorns and as the suckers you see will be of wild pear this explains the thorns.

By Gillian Corrigan Devlin on 02/05/2019

We have had these trees planted outside on our street yesterday. How often should they be watered after planting?

By Simon on 03/05/2019

Hello Gillian,

Water them well twice a week during typical weather, but if we have prolonged dry periods you’ll need to water more.

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