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Cheals Weeping Cherry Prunus Kiku Shidare Sakura

Description & features

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Product description

PRUNUS KIKU SHIDARE SAKURE – Cheal’s Weeping Cherry

Characteristics

This ornamental cherry is a very small weeping tree with steeply arching branches which bear densely clustered, large, double rose pink flowers.  The young leaves are bronze-green and become dark green later on.

This flowering cherry is popular probably because it is so miniature rarely growing more the 2.5m (8ft) tall and the same in width it will fit the smallest space.  Unashamedly blousy, some would say gaudy in full flower it looks like a stick of candyfloss at a fair.

Where to grow

Ornamental cherries grow best in full sun on moist fertile deep loamy soils, it is perfectly happy on alkaline soils which it prefers.  It will therefore grow well in most garden or parkland positions.  Poor soils should have organic matter added to the backfill during planting.  It does not like waterlogged or permanently wet ground.

Did you know?

In Japanese ‘Kiku-shidare-sakura’ means ‘Weeping Chrysanthemum Cherry’.  It is an old Japanese cultivar which is known since the end of the 19th century. It was introduced into Europe around 1915.

Features

Mature height
Very Small up to 5 metres
Spread
0-5 metres
Shape / habit
Weeping
Growth rate
Medium
Soil type
All soil types
Sun levels
Full sun
Partial shade
Difficulty / hard to grow
Medium
Evergreen / Deciduous
Deciduous
Season of interest
Autumn
Spring
Autumn colour
Orange
Yellow
Leaf
Green
Flower colour
Pink
Flowering type
Double
Flowering month
May
Uses
Small garden Tree
Suitable for Patio

Features

Mature height
Very Small up to 5 metres
Spread
0-5 metres
Shape / habit
Weeping
Growth rate
Medium
Soil type
All soil types
Sun levels
Full sun
Partial shade
Difficulty / hard to grow
Medium
Evergreen / Deciduous
Deciduous
Season of interest
Autumn
Spring
Autumn colour
Orange
Yellow
Leaf
Green
Flower colour
Pink
Flowering type
Double
Flowering month
May
Uses
Small garden Tree
Suitable for Patio

Aftercare

For the continued healthy growth of your trees, shrubs or hedging it is vital that you follow the advice below.

Watering

The main reason that plants die within 12 months of having been planted is lack of water.  It is essential throughout the spring and summer, to give a heavy enough watering to enable the water to penetrate right down to the deepest root level of the tree.  In hot dry spells give the equivalent of 2 bucketfuls every three days.

Weed Control

One of the most common causes of lack of water is competition from grass.  When trees are first establishing, the grass roots would be at the same level as the tree roots and are far more efficient at taking up water and thus choke the tree.  It is vital for 3 years after planting that your tree or hedge has a circle or strip one  metre wide completely free of grass.  The way to eliminate grass in order of effectiveness is:

  1. Spray off the grass with a glyphosate based weed killer such as Roundup.  Apply each year for the first 3 years.  It is best applied when the tree is dormant as it is absorbed through green leaves and kills the plant off at the roots.
  2. Firmly fit a mulch mat around the base of the tree by tucking the edges into the soil and put a thick layer of bark mulch on top of this.  This can be done after the initial spraying with glyphosate and should avoid the need for further spraying.

Mowing or strimming is NOT an answer to the problem.  Each time you mow, the grass will grow back more vigorously and strimming invariably leads to lacerated trunks.

Staking

If trees are not correctly secured they will rock in the planting pit. Roots not firmly in contact with the soil are unable to take up moisture and nutrients, resulting in die back or death of the tree.  Check, particularly after windy weather, that stakes are still solidly in the ground keeping the base of the trunk firm.  The purpose of the stakes is to anchor the roots.   Flexing in the wind, higher up the trunk, is not necessarily a problem if the roots are firm.

Bellow is list of the correct system to use to secure your trees.

  • 40/60, 60/80, 80/100 whips - Unless rabbit/deer problem no need to stake.
  • 100/125, 125/150  1.2m Cane and Easi tie.
  • 150/175  1.2m square stake and a buckle tie and spacer.
  • 175/250, 6/8, 8/10 15L 1.65 Tree stake and a buckle tie and spacer.
  • All larger trees. 2 x 1.65 Tree stake and cross rail with 38mm cushion spacer and 1m of 38mm strapping.

Ties

Always use our recommended tree ties or strapping.  These are designed and manufactured with the correct amount of give to hold the tree firm without strangling it. They should be checked at the end of each growing season for adjustment as the trunk thickens.  Non proprietary materials such as baler twine will cut into the bark and should not be used.

Protection from Animal Damage

Rabbits, deer, sheep, cattle and horses can all potentially damage trees.  Ask us for advice on the most appropriate guards for your trees or hedge.  Squirrels are also a terrible pest when trees get to about 20ft tall but there is no protection available.


Comments

By marion on 15/03/2015

can I plant a small weeping prunus kiku shidare in a tub?

By Simon on 23/03/2015

Hello Marion,

You could keep it in a tub for a number of years as long as you watered it every day in the spring and summer. But over time all trees like to be planted out.

I hope this helps.

By marjo on 27/03/2015

Hi i have one and we are now going into Autumn i have found the last couple of weeks the trunk is starting to shoot new branches here and there what do i do as i didnt think this would happen.Only thought they were meant to have top growth.Would welcome a reply please.Thanks.Marjo

By Simon on 01/05/2015

Hello Marjo,

You often find with weeping trees that they will shoot from the truck. I don’t know if this is a top grafted or bottom grafted specimen but the solution is the same, you just need to prune off any unwanted growth.

By betty llang on 05/05/2015

I have just planted a Cheals Weeping Cherry which has now started flowering.  My soil is sandy and the tree is in a sheltered site which gets a lot of sun.  Could you recommend to me what to underplant as the area below the tree is bare at the moment.  I thought of putting in something like pansies for this summer but wondered what to do after that.  Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

By David on 09/05/2015

Hello - Does this tree produce fruit?
Thanks!

By Simon on 18/05/2015

Hello Betty,

I am afraid for the 1st couple of years you want to keep the base of the tree free from any planting. The reason for this is it will compete for water and nutrient. Also as it is a weeping tree you will find that the branches arch to the floor so any planting would get shaded out.

By Simon on 18/05/2015

Hello David,

I am afraid this is an ornamental cherry so won’t produce any edible fruit.

Kind regards,

Simon

By jackie on 24/10/2015

Hello, I have just bought a dwarf cheals weeping cherry and the only option is to grow it in a pot in full sun.  Is it best to have a square pot as I don’t know how much the roots wil spead. Looking forward to your reply.

By Simon on 24/10/2015

Hello Jackie,

A square pot or a round one is fine, as long as it is large and you water it in spring and summer. It will also need feeding - a slow release fertiliser works well.

By sue on 02/07/2016

We have a 5 or 6 year Prunus cheals weeping colt can you tell me when I can prune
it as it is getting quite big and how to prune.

By Simon on 06/07/2016

Hello Sue,

If carrying out any pruning on cherry trees, it needs to be done in the summer to minimise the risk of silver leaf disease entering through the pruning wounds. Firstly take out any dead, diseased or damaged branches. You will also want to remove crossing branches before anything else, so they don’t rub on each other. If you then need to take more off, you can reduce branches by up to a third, cutting just above a leaf node. Hope that helps.

By Charlie D on 04/07/2017

Our roof terrace receives full sun but is completely exposed to Southern-easterly winds. We have willow fencing of up to 1.2m in height, but beyond that height, there’s no barrier. We had bamboo trees before, but they shed all their leaves in the winter, and subsequently died (this was before we put up fencing though). Would PRUNUS KIKU SHIDARE SAKURA work for our terrace?

By Simon on 07/07/2017

Hello Charlie,

Flowering cherry trees are best in a more sheltered position, so if there are strong winds then Prunus Kiku Shidare may not fare well. Thorn trees such as Crataegus prunifolia splendens or Crataegus Crimson Cloud cope well with exposure. Presumably you are planting into containers? A word of caution - it is quite a task to keep things thriving in containers as they mustn’t be allowed to dry out and must be fed in the growing season. After some years, trees are likely to become pot-bound as the roots circle and fill up the container, limiting their longevity. Smaller trees and shrubs, or those you can prune to stay small are the best options for containers.

By Claire Bowers on 15/04/2020

Hello,
What is the best way to prune this tree?
I pruned the top of tree last autumn and this spring there branches sticking out top but no flowers on these branches. There are flowers underneath.
Heat do you suggest I do please?
Thanks
Claire

By Simon on 16/04/2020

Hello Claire,

With cherries it is best to keep pruning to a minimum, only pruning if there are severely crossing stems, or pruning out damaged branches.
I hope this helps,

By Anna Watts on 19/04/2020

Is it best to have 2 trees for pollination purposes?

By Simon on 20/04/2020

Hello Anna,
This is a sterile cherry, developed for its blossom it won’t produce any fruit.

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